Pleated Beauty Handbag, finally finished

This project, the Pleated Beauty Hanbag from Bend the Rules Sewing, has been in process for what seems like a couple of months now. I have been busy with life in general and have completed bits and pieces of this bag when I could. This was my first try at embroidery and I like the interest it adds to the bag. I echoed the leaf pattern on the pleating fabric with a basic running stitch.

I altered the straps from the book directions. To make them more sturdy, I added rigid interfacing (Pellon 70) and made them 1.5 wide. I like the outcome.
With each project, I find that I learn a few lessons. The main fabric is a linen suiting which was difficult to work with – stretchy and drapey, not ideal for such a structured bag. I added fusible interfacing which made the bag less floppy but the linen puckered a little after multiple pressings. Toward the end, there was just too much bulk in the finished seams. My little sewing machine struggled sewing the seam around the top due to the bulk from the pleats and handles. There should be an edgestitch around the top, but I can’t even get the finished edge under my pressure foot. I’ll settle for a good press at the top.
Advertisements

One thought on “Pleated Beauty Handbag, finally finished

  1. Ooh, wonderful bag!! I have this same fabric right now, used in a quilt for my brother. I love how you echoed the pattern in the embroidery. So creative. And turned out lovely!!!As for the bulky seams near the end, that reminds of me of something I read about somewhere, was intrigued by, but could only find one other pseudo-reference to online: a sewing hammer. Someone had listed it as one of their “must have” tools. Apparently, it’s for whacking thick seams with, to make them thinner and more able to be sewn… Seemed so ingenious, I wondered why they aren’t commonplace — perhaps the whacking weakens the fibers??? Anyway, I did try it myself once using just my regular household hammer and it did seem to help with the thickenss issue and didn’t seem to damage anything. The images I found of “sewing hammers” had a soft-plastic-covered head, probably to protext whatever fabric you’re pounding.OK, better get back to my to-do list. It was nice to browse your blog for a while…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s